In Germany, police fired 85 bullets in all of 2011.

rosswoodpark:

homewreckingwhore:

tormady:

opera4breakfast:

foulmouthedliberty:

think-progress:

In the U.S., police fired 90 shots at one unarmed man in Los Angeles. 

Not to mention, they hit him only like 10 times. Spray and pray as always, LAPD.

The Norwegian police has fired 79 shots since 1994.

>The Norwegian police has fired 79 shots since 1994.
 

Let’s go to Norway

(Source: , via sonofbaldwin)

mencanstoprape:

In the twenty-first century, no brand, company, organization, or movement is complete without some visual representation. The Healthy Masculinity Action Project is no different. Now, with the “I Support Healthy Masculinity” icon, you can promote healthy masculinity and the Healthy Masculinity Action Project.
The Healthy Masculinity Action Project (HMAP) is a two-year national movement to develop new male leadership that role models strength without violence. The Healthy Masculinity Action Project begins in October with the Healthy Masculinity Summit in Washington, DC.
Despite only four words in the statement, “I Support Healthy Masculinity,” it says so much more. Supporting healthy masculinity is supporting communities that are free from street harassment and domestic violence, and lives that are better for women, children, and men. Generating conversations about healthy masculinity is a vital step in creating healthy relationships of all kinds.
As the weeks leading up to the Healthy Masculinity Summit continue, your support of HMAP will become increasingly critical in spreading the message of healthy masculinity.
So, do you support healthy masculinity?
Show it with the “I Support Healthy Masculinity” icon!
For more information, contact: info@healthymasculinity.org

mencanstoprape:

In the twenty-first century, no brand, company, organization, or movement is complete without some visual representation. The Healthy Masculinity Action Project is no different. Now, with the “I Support Healthy Masculinity” icon, you can promote healthy masculinity and the Healthy Masculinity Action Project.

The Healthy Masculinity Action Project (HMAP) is a two-year national movement to develop new male leadership that role models strength without violence. The Healthy Masculinity Action Project begins in October with the Healthy Masculinity Summit in Washington, DC.

Despite only four words in the statement, “I Support Healthy Masculinity,” it says so much more. Supporting healthy masculinity is supporting communities that are free from street harassment and domestic violence, and lives that are better for women, children, and men. Generating conversations about healthy masculinity is a vital step in creating healthy relationships of all kinds.

As the weeks leading up to the Healthy Masculinity Summit continue, your support of HMAP will become increasingly critical in spreading the message of healthy masculinity.

So, do you support healthy masculinity?

Show it with the “I Support Healthy Masculinity” icon!

For more information, contact: info@healthymasculinity.org

feminishblog:

This is a very important message. In addition however, I would like to add that you don’t owe anyone your forgiveness. When it comes to abusive relationships, no matter whom between and what the nature of the relationship is, the only person who you owe something to is yourself. Do whatever it takes you to heal and recover. If that is forgiving your abuser so that you can move on, then do it, but if it’s not, there is no reason to feel guilty.
In a very volatile relationship I had when I was younger, my first real relationship to be exact, my partner was abusive. I felt worse and worse every day, but I always forgave him. Here’s the kicker: I did it because I thought I had to. I was taught being a good person meant always taking the higher ground and forgiving someone if they expressed remorse (or something that mimicked remorse to forge guilt). And as someone raised in a religious home, I was also taught that it was not our place to judge people, but God’s. Who was I to not forgive someone? How was I any better…? Well you know what? I was better. I was too good for that. I did not deserve to be abused every day, made to feel nothing but misery, despair, and agony. You don’t deserve it either. No one does. Ever. Period. No exceptions.

feminishblog:

This is a very important message. In addition however, I would like to add that you don’t owe anyone your forgiveness. When it comes to abusive relationships, no matter whom between and what the nature of the relationship is, the only person who you owe something to is yourself. Do whatever it takes you to heal and recover. If that is forgiving your abuser so that you can move on, then do it, but if it’s not, there is no reason to feel guilty.

In a very volatile relationship I had when I was younger, my first real relationship to be exact, my partner was abusive. I felt worse and worse every day, but I always forgave him. Here’s the kicker: I did it because I thought I had to. I was taught being a good person meant always taking the higher ground and forgiving someone if they expressed remorse (or something that mimicked remorse to forge guilt). And as someone raised in a religious home, I was also taught that it was not our place to judge people, but God’s. Who was I to not forgive someone? How was I any better…? Well you know what? I was better. I was too good for that. I did not deserve to be abused every day, made to feel nothing but misery, despair, and agony. You don’t deserve it either. No one does. Ever. Period. No exceptions.

maymay:

This comment was posted as a response to my Atlanta Poly Weekend 2012 Opening Keynote, “From Triads to Tradic Relationships: Polyamory’s superpower is not what you think,” and it’s possibly one of my favorite comments ever:

I liked this post

1) as a poly person who’s never been a…